IIX.

The Real Function Of This Blog Anyway.

salubrious
Health-giving; healthy.

syzygy
{ˈsizijē} A conjunction or opposition, esp. of the moon with the sun; A pair of connected or corresponding things.

morganatic
Of or denoting a marriage in which neither the spouse of lower rank nor any children have any claim to the possessions or title of the spouse of higher rank. [From medieval Latin matrimonium ad morganaticam ‘marriage with a morning gift’. (Because a morning gift, given by a husband to his wife on the morning after the marriage, was the wife’s sole entitlement in a marriage of this kind. So basically she had to really impress him on their wedding night in order not to be left in poverty at his death.)]

populist
A member or adherent of a political party seeking to represent the interests of ordinary people.

antipode
The direct opposite of something else. [Via late Latin from Greek antipodes ‘having the feet opposite’. The term originally denoted the inhabitants of opposite sides of the earth, or of the side opposite to oneself, and now is used by inhabitants of the Northern Hemisphere to denote New Zealand and Australia.]

superannuate
Retire (someone) with a pension; Cause to become obsolete through age or new technological or intellectual developments.

scrofula
A disease with glandular swellings, probably a form of tuberculosis.

hubris
In Greek tragedy: Excessive pride toward or defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis.

fealty
A feudal tenant’s or vassal’s sworn loyalty to a lord.

pilcrow
A paragraph mark: ¶ (Not found in the OAD!)

notional
Existing only in theory or as a suggestion or idea.

anisotropic
Having a physical property that has a different value when measured in different directions. (Ex: Wood, which is stronger along the grain than across it.)

putative
Generally considered or reputed to be.

junket
A dish of sweetened and flavored curds of milk, often served with fruit. / An extravagant trip or celebration, in particular one enjoyed by a government official at public expense.

plebescite
The direct vote of all the members of an electorate on an important public question such as a change in the constitution.

pro tanto
To such an extent; to that extent.

parochial
Of or relating to a church parish; Having a limited or narrow outlook or scope.

pedagogy
{ˈpedəˌgäjē} The method and practice of teaching, esp. as an academic subject or theoretical concept.

Shriner
A member of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, a charitable society founded in the U.S. in 1872.

catholic
Including a wide variety of things; all-embracing. [From Greek katholikos ‘universal’, from kata ‘with respect to’ + holos ‘whole’.]

chinois
A cone-shaped sieve with a closely woven mesh for straining sauces.

chinoiserie
The imitation or evocation of Chinese motifs and techniques in Western art, furniture, and architecture, esp. in the 18th century.

vitriol
Sulfuric acid; figurative cruel and bitter criticism.

allée
An alley in a formal garden or park, bordered by trees or bushes.

lagniappe
Something given as a bonus or extra gift.

ham-fisted, ham-handed
NOT stingy, but clumsy; bungling. Who knew!

Hibernian
Irish.

punter
A player who punts (rugby/football). / A person who gambles, places a bet, or makes a risky investment; a customer or client, esp. a member of an audience; the victim of a swindler or confidence trickster; a prostitute’s client.

sward
An expanse of short grass; The upper layer of soil, especially when covered with grass.

omophagy
The eating of raw food, especially raw meat.

troika
A Russian vehicle pulled by a team of three horses abreast.

indurate
Harden.

canard
An unfounded rumor or story. / A small winglike projection attached to an aircraft forward of the main wing to provide extra stability or control, sometimes replacing the tail.

intransigent
Unwilling or refusing to change one’s views or to agree about something.

dissimulate
Conceal or disguise [one’s thoughts, feelings, or character].

instantiate
Represent as or by an instance; represent [a universal or abstract concept] by an actual example.

praxis
(Formal) Practice, as distinguished from theory.

ossify
Turn into bone or bony tissue.

ken
To know; To recognize, identify. / One’s range of knowledge or sight.

parse
Analyze [a sentence, or a computing string or text] into its parts and describe their syntactic roles or conformability to a logical grammar.

otiose
Serving no practical purpose; idle.

collate
Compare and analyze [texts or other data]; collect and combine [texts, information, or sets of figures] in proper order.

benefice
A permanent Church appointment, typically that of a rector or vicar, for which property and income are provided in respect of pastoral duties. [From Latin beneficium ‘favor, support’.]

putative
Generally considered or reputed to be.

syndicalism
A movement for transferring the ownership and control of the means of production and distribution to workers’ unions.

damask
A figured woven fabric with a pattern visible on both sides, typically used for table linen and upholstery.

enjoin
Instruct or urge [someone] to do something; Prescribe [an action or attitude] to be performed or adopted. / (enjoin [someone] from) Prohibit someone from performing [a particular action] by issuing an injunction.

concatenate
Link [things] together in a chain or series.

Ponzi scheme
A form of fraud in which belief in the success of a nonexistent enterprise is fostered by the payment of quick returns to the first investors from money invested by later investors.

bariatric
The branch of medicine that deals with the study and treatment of obesity.

plenary
Absolute. / (of a meeting) To be attended by all participants at a conference or assembly, who otherwise meet in smaller groups.

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