IIV.

Not For The Faint Of Heart:

dyspareunia
Difficult or painful sexual intercourse.

eschaton
The final event in the divine plan; the end of the world.

eschatology
The part of theology concerned with death, judgment, and the final destiny of the soul and of humankind.

congenial
Pleasant or agreeable because suited to one’s taste or inclination.

noumenal
(In Kantian philosophy) As [a thing] is in itself, as distinct from as it is knowable by the senses through phenomenal attributes.

syllogism
Deductive reasoning as distinct from induction (Aristotelian logic).

votary
A devoted follower, adherent, or advocate of someone or something.

non sequitur
(Latin ‘it does not follow.’)

colophon
An inscription placed at the end of a book or manuscript usually with facts relative to its production; An identifying mark, emblem, or device used by a printer or a publisher.

op-ed
Printed on the page opposite the  orial page in a newspaper, devoted to commentary, feature articles, etc.

perjorative
Expressing contempt or disapproval.

vilify
Speak or write about in an abusively disparaging manner.

cooperative
A farm, business, or other organization that is owned and run jointly by its members, who share the profits or benefits.

corporation
A company or group of people authorized to act as a single entity (legally a person) and recognized as such in law.

troglodyte
A prehistoric cave dweller./ A person living in seclusion./ A person unacquainted with affairs of the world./ An animal living underground.

coda
The concluding passage, event, remark or section of a piece, movement, or dance.

humanism
Stress the potential value of human beings, emphasize common human needs, and seek solely rational ways of solving human problems. Criticized as being centered on the notion of the rational self and ignoring the conditioned nature of the individual.

harridan
A strict, bossy, or belligerent old woman.

venal
Showing or motivated by susceptibility to bribery.

venial
Denoting a sin that is not regarded as depriving the soul of divine grace, in contrast with mortal sins.

derisory
Ridiculously small or inadequate; derisive.

termagant
An imaginary deity of violent and turbulent character. (From Latin Trivigante, tri- ‘three’ + vagant- ‘wandering,’ referring to the moon “wandering” between heaven, earth, and hell under the three names Selene, Artemis, and Persephone.)

prolific
Very small in size or amount.

ex postfacto
(Latin, ‘in the light of subsequent events.’)

ex nihilo
(Latin, ‘Out of nothing.’)

attention
(From Latin attendere: ad ‘to’ and tendere ‘stretch.’)

prolific
Producing much fruit or foliage or many offspring./ Present in large numbers or quantities; plentiful.

logistics
The detailed coordination of a complex operation involving many people, facilities, or supplies.

mammilla
The nipple of a woman’s breast./ A nipple-shaped structure.

prodigal
Wastefully extravagant; having or giving something on a lavish scale.

pragmatism
An approach that assesses the truth of meaning of theories or beliefs in terms of the success of their practical application.

pragmatic
Dealing with things sensibly and realistically in a way that is based on practical rather than theoretical considerations.

concupiscence
Strong sexual desire; lust.

pedant
A person who is excessively concerned with minor details and rules or with displaying academic learning.

solecism
A grammatical mistake in speech or writing./ A breach of good manners; a piece of incorrect behavior.

chiaroscuro
The treatment of light and shade in drawing and painting. An effect of contrasted light and shadow created by light falling unevenly.

hypernym
A word with a broad meaning that more specific words fall under.

ersatz
Made or used as a substitute, typically an inferior one, for something else.

Mammon
Wealth regarded as an evil influence or false object of worship and devotion.

immolate
Kill or offer as a sacrifice, esp. by burning.

recapitulate
Summarize and state again the main points of.

propinquity
Proximity; Close kinship.

barbarians
Members of a community or tribe not belonging to one of the great civilizations (Greek, Roman, Christian).

Goths
A Germanic people that invaded the Roman Empire from the east between the 3rd and 5th centuries. The eastern division, the Ostrogoths, founded a kingdom in Italy, while the Visigoths went on to found one in Spain.

AD
Anno Domini

Vandals
A Germanic people that ravaged Gaul, Spain, and North Africa in the 4th–5th centuries and sacked Rome in ad 455.

stigma
A mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality, or person.

subvert
Undermine the power and authority of (an established system or institution).

Orient
(From Latin orient ‘rising or east’ from oriri ‘to rise’.)

noon
(From Latin nona, ‘ninth hour’.)

oenophile
A connoisseur of wines.

adumbrate
Report or represent in outline; indicate faintly; foreshadow or symbolize; overshadow. Denotations of hauntedness or ghostliness?

acquisitive
Excessively interested in acquiring money or material things.

rapacious
Aggressively greedy.

corroborate
Confirm or give support to (a statement, theory, or finding).

statutory
Required, permitted, or made law by statute.

elicidate
Shedding light upon something through explanation, illustration, etc.

conducive [to]
Making a certain situation or outcome likely or possible.

stertorous
(Of breathing) noisy and labored; snoring.

verdure
Lush green vegetation; greenness or freshness.

phaeton
A light, open, four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage.

repudiate
refuse to accept or be associated with; deny the validity of; Divorce.

panacea
A solution or remedy for all difficulties or diseases.

digitalis
A drug prepared from the dried leaves of foxglove that stimulates the heart muscle.

contrition
The state of feeling remorseful and penitent.

attrition
Gradually reducing the effectiveness of someone or something through sustained attack or pressure; Sorrow, but not contrition, for sin.

placate
Suggests changing a hostile or angry attitude to a friendly or favorable one, usually with a more complete or long-lasting effect than to appease.

quondam
Former; that once was. Ex:”…the quondam “careless bachelor” begins to think he knows…”

vacillate
Be indecisive.

vicissitude
A change of circumstances or fortune, typically one that is unpleasant; Alternation between opposite or contrasting things.

apothegm
A concise saying; maxim; aphorism.

pleurisy
Inflammation that causes pain when breathing, caused by pneumonia and other diseases of the chest.

incipient
Beginning to happen or develop

prose
(In the Eucharist) A hymn said or sung after the Gradual or Alleluia that precedes the Gospel.

effulgent
Shining brightly; radiant.

nocuous
Noxious, harmful, or poisonous.

utopia
Based on Greek ou ‘not’ + topos ‘place.’

sublime
Of such excellence, grandeur, or beauty as to inspire great awe; used to denote the unparalleled nature of a person’s behavior./ Elevate to a high degree of spiritual excellence.

pedant
A person who is excessively concerned with minor details and rules or with displaying academic learning.

hongi
A traditional Maori greeting in which people press their noses together.

Logos
Greek “word; reason.”

advent
Approach. (From Latin aduentus, of ad+venire, ‘to come’.)

adventure
(From French aventure, ‘a chance occurrence’, from Latin aduenturus, ‘about to happen’, future participle of aduenire, ‘to approach’.)

apposite
Apt in the circumstances or in relation to something.

gestalt
A collection of physical, biological, psychological or symbolic entities that creates a unified concept, configuration or pattern which is greater than the sum of its parts.

supernumerary
Present in excess of the normal or requisite number; redundant.

pathos
A quality that evokes pity or sadness. Greek ‘suffering’.

portent
A sign or warning that something, esp. something momentous or calamitous, is likely to happen; an exceptional or wonderful person or thing.

honeymoon
(mid 16th cent.(originally denoting the period of time following a wedding): from honey + moon . The original reference was to affection waning like the moon)

adjuration
A solemn or earnest urge or request (of someone) to do something.

acrimonious
Angry and bitter (speech or a debate).

filial
Of or due from a son or daughter.

imbibe
To drink (alcohol); absorb or assimilate (ideas or knowledge); absorb (water) into ultramicroscopic spaces or pores.

slattern
A dirty, untidy woman.

repugnance
Intense disgust; Inconsistency or incompatibility of ideas or statements.

remittance
A sum of money sent, esp. by mail, in payment for goods or services or as a gift.

german
Germane. / Having the same parents.

germane
Relevant to a subject under consideration.

proxy
The authority to represent someone else, esp. in voting; a person authorized to act on behalf of another.

desultory
Lacking a plan, purpose, or enthusiasm; The “planning” part of our weekend movie nights.

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  • history.